**MEDIA ADVISORY / INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITIES, PRESS BRIEFING TUESDAY, 10 MARCH, JAKARTA

**MEDIA ADVISORY / INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITIES,

PRESS BRIEFING TUESDAY, 10 MARCH, JAKARTA

Armed with evidence of forest peoples’ ability to protect forests and slow climate change, Indonesia’s renowned AMAN celebrates 16 years in battle for rights of nation’s Indigenous peoples; launches film festival and events in Jakarta and West Papua

Indigenous leaders from Latin America, Asia, Americas in Indonesia to report on use of new tools—including drones, maps—to guard forests in face of growing global demand for commodities that fuel deforestation, incite violence

As national governments proclaim new strategies to combat climate change and seek new ways to encourage transparency and sustainable development, dozens of indigenous leaders from tropical forest nations will gather in Jakarta next week to demand the land rights that would allow them to continue doing what they have been proven to do best: protect the globe’s carbon-sequestering forests from destruction.

On March 10, a press briefing will launch five days of events in Jakarta that will draw experts on deforestation, indigenous land rights, community forestry, mapping, drones for monitoring compliance in the forests, food security and other issues.

Indigenous leaders from the forests of Costa Rica and Panama will report on the impact of strong rights on their forests and on economic development in Central America.

Visitors from throughout Southeast Asia and Latin America will join Indonesia’s indigenous leaders in recounting stories of successes in claiming their rights, and celebrate the 16th anniversary of the country’s 15-million strong indigenous group, Aliansi Masyarakat Adat Nusantara (AMAN).

A member of Indonesia’s Human Rights Commission is expected to review initial findings of an upcoming report concerning recent rights abuses against indigenous peoples, and leaders of two forested Indonesian islands will tell of successful battles to prevent agricultural giants from planting palm oil and sugar cane on their lands.

WHAT: Press briefing to launch a week of events and films in celebration the 16th anniversary of the AliansiMasyarakat Adat Nusantara (AMAN), marking as well a moment in the nation’s history when the new president’s policies seem to promise progress in advancing the rights of Indonesia’s millions of forest peoples.

WHEN:

10:00am – 12:00pm

March 10, 2015

WHERE:   FX, Jl. Jenderal Sudirman, Jakarta Pusat

WHO:

  • Abdon Nababan, AMAN
  • Jaleswari Pramodhawardhani, Staf Khusus Sekretaris Kabinet
  • Pak Hariadi Kartodihardjo, of the National Commission on Human Rights (Invited)
  • Paul Redman, Handcrafted Films
  • Candido Mezua, COONAPIP, indigenous leader from Panama who has joined Abdon Nababan of AMAN on the global stage

In the last year, Cándido Mezua, an Embera-Wounaan of the remote Darien forest in Panama, has joined forces with Abdon Nababan of AMAN in bringing the voices of indigenous peoples to forums worldwide, where they have begun to successfully argue for funds to support indigenous solutions to climate change and sustainable development that already exist

Granting land rights to indigenous peoples is one of the most successful forest conservation strategies. In many areas, indigenous lands have lower deforestation rates than even national parks and protected areas. Yet globally, indigenous peoples receive little support and are often threatened by outside actors from extractive and agricultural industries, who raid indigenous land for timber and other resources.

From Africa to Southeast Asia to the Americas, indigenous peoples are facing similar challenges. And they have unique solutions that, if given more weight, would benefit not only their communities but also the planet. As global leaders debate land use, forests, food security and other climate-related issues, it will be critical to include the voices of indigenous peoples who manage, protect and live on the lands in question. The world cannot prevent climate change without their support.

OTHER EVENTS IN JAKARTA NEXT WEEK (TO BE FOLLOWED BY A WEEK OF EVENTS IN WEST PAPUA, WITH VISITS TO INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES)

  • Wednesday, 11 March

o   Global Indigenous movement, the drum beat to Paris – 11am
Discussion on Land, Territories, Forest and ensuring the recognition and protection of the rights of Indigenous Peoples’ and local communities

o   Drones & phones – 3pm
How new technology is helping communities map their lands more effectively

  • Thursday 12 March

o   Case Study from Costa Rica – 10.30 am
Imagine communities and land-owners being paid by the government to protect their forests and natural resources.

o   Candido Mezúa – 3 pm
Panamanian Indigenous Leader who was present at AMAN’s first conference in 1999 returns 16 years later.

  • Friday 13th March

o   Zero deforestation must mean Zero Violence and Zero Killings – 9.30 am
Dialogue with National Commission On Human Rights.

o   Small islands and the fight for survival – 3:00pm
Two successful indigenous campaigns to save the forest from exploitation.

DETAILS:
For more information, to request interviews or attend press briefings, please contact one of the following:

Wanda Bautista, wbautista@burness.com

+1 302 233 5438, or

Coimbra Sirica, csirica@burness.com

+1 301 943 3287