• 13:42 Now Playing

    Ka'a Zar Ukyze Wà - Forest Keepers in Danger

    Indigenous filmmakers from Midia India release documentary alerting to the grave situation faced by their uncontacted relatives the Awá Guajá, from the Araribóia indigenous territory, one of the most endangered in the Amazon.

    The Awá Guajá depend intrinsically on the forest for survival – for hunting, for gathering, for water. However, the forest in the Araribóia indigenous territory is under serious threat. Around it nothing is left standing. Official data from the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) show that Maranhão has already deforested 46% of its forest cover. In the six municipalities around the indigenous territory, this number is even higher: 52.5%.

    The uncontacted Awá Guajá indigenous peoples, share Araribóia indigenous territory with their Guajajara relatives. There are 120 Guajajaras who fight to protect the remaining forest in their land and to guarantee the existence of their uncontacted relatives through their surveillance and monitoring activities.

    Indigenous filmmaker Flay Guajajara took this footage, creating this documentary to mobilize forest defenders globally.

    Erisvan Guajajara of Mídia Índia says:

    “We didn’t have the Awá’s permission to film, but we know that it’s important to use these images because if we don’t show them around the world, the Awá will be killed by loggers. We need to show that the Awá exist and their lives are at risk. We’re using these images as a cry for help and we’re calling for the government to protect the lives of our relatives who don’t want contact with outsiders.”

  • 5:41 Now Playing

    Tîtko: the epic journey of the Brazil Nut and the Wai Wai people

    The Brazil nut has always been a centerpiece of Wai Wai food culture. With the organization of the production chain, it has become a driver that is transforming lives and reinforcing the protection of a territory afflicted by invaders.

  • 08:16 Now Playing

    Freedom - Brazil

    Brazil’s African slave descendants, the Quilombola, have fought a long and hard struggle for recognition. After the abolition of the slave trade they were left abandoned and ostracised, devoid of rights and outside of Brazilian mainstream society. But things are slowly changing amongst rural communities. In the 1988 constitution Brazil’s Quilombola were granted access to land rights and since then they have been actively building a way to secure land titles on the sites where many have lived for generations. Community mapping is an important tool in this process, as is increasing awareness amongst the Brazilian population through education and ecotourism. ‘Freedom’ looks at two Quilombola communities, one with no land title and one benefitting from legal recognition, and examines the disparities between them.

  • 8:57 Now Playing

    Burning the Bananal

    Wildfires are increasing in their frequency and ferocity worldwide – they consume forests and destroy lives. Is there a more effective way to fight them?

    Fighting fire with fire

    Traditional fire management practices hold many answers. Controlled fires, which were widely banned by colonialist authorities, had long been used by indigenous peoples to maintain their land and forests and to protect their peoples from large-scale wildfires.

    In recent years, the Brazilian Environment Ministry has been working in partnership with indigenous communities. They have been learning from elders about fire management, employing indigenous firefighters and investing in the application of these practices on a vast scale. This approach has evolved into the Integrated Fire Management strategy, using prescribed burns at particular times of year so as to prevent large-scale destruction when the hot and dry wildfire season arrives. Traditional knowledge is the basis for all the work of prescribed burns in indigenous territories and is already being carried out in 7 Brazilian states (Mato Grosso, Roraima, Mato Grosso do Sul, Goias, Maranhao, Tocantins, Amazonas) throughout roughly 11 million hectares of indigenous territories.

    See it in practice in this short film Burning the Bananal.

    Societies across the world will struggle to deal with the increasing impacts of climate change – at this crucial juncture in our humanity we need to listen, learn, respect and support indigenous traditional knowledge.

  • 3:38 Now Playing

    Campaign 'Tamuaté Aki' in support of indigenous peoples

    “Tamuaté-Aki” (We are fed up) is a campaign from Uma Gota no Oceano and the filmmaker Marcos Prado. The result was 4 million and a half emails that were sent by the population to the National Congress, claiming the right of indigenous peoples to land demarcation in Brazil. The campaign highlights the importance of indigenous lands, relates the rights of indigenous peoples to the effect of climate – noting that the last large green areas of the Brazilian Amazon are indigenous territories and that is why they are threatened.

    Find out more at: umagotanooceano.org

  • 2:07 Now Playing

    Solar Xingu

    In an effort to reduce dependence on diesel, ISA, in partnership with the communities of the Xingu Indigenous Park, and the USP Energy and Environment Institute (IEE-USP), will bring solar energy generation systems to the region. 55 schools, 22 health posts and a further ten community points to support productive activities.

     

  • 9:28 Now Playing

    Week of Harvesting: inspiring the old, valuing the young

    Terra do Meio in it’s fifth year brings together indigenous and local communities. The network of cantinas is able to supply traditional produce from the Amazon in a way that supports local communities and protects the forest. The Xipaya, Curuáya, Xikrin, Yudjá and Arara peoples joined by the banks of the Rio Xingu Extractive Reserves, Rio Iriri and Riozinho do Anfrísio, in Pará, for the celebration of traditional knowledge, harvesting, the economy of social and environmental diversity, transparency and importantly, autonomy.

  • 6:35 Now Playing

    Amazon Alive for Humanity

    Having lived for millennia in the forests of the ‘Amazonian Trapezoid’, today the Amacayacu National Park, indigenous communities there are now treated as an obstacle to conservation. Their rights have been systematically violated since the National Park was created in 1975.

    In April 2015 the Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Tourism signed an agreement to carry out the construction of a tourist trail, but without previous consultation of local communities. This infrastructure project would include the construction of extensive walking routes and amenities along an 8km route through pristine forest, communities and rivers.

    The Tikuna, Yaguas and Cocamas who live in San Martín de Amacayacu have denounced the violation of their right to free, prior and informed consent. As such they have urged the Colombian government to stop the construction activities and carry out the consultation process.

  • 2:22 Now Playing

    Free Land Camp 2018

    The final day of the Free Land Camp 2018 was marked by a march against the continuing genocide suffered by indigenous peoples, where a large blood trail was left on the Esplanade of the Ministries to remind everyone that indigenous peoples still bleed.

  • 5:45 Now Playing

    The women behind Baniwa Jiquitaia Pepper

    The Baniwa women of the Upper Negro River (AM) lead the production of their traditional pepper, the Baniwa Jiquitaia Pepper. Their strength was demonstrated in the inauguration of the Canadá Community House of Pepper, on the Ayari River, in May 2018. From the farming of the peppers to the labeling, filling and management of the Houses of Pepper, the work of the women underpins the production of the jiquitaia, which is growing in both domestic and international markets and helps the communities resist the threats and pressures on their land.

    Learn more about this story: http://bit.ly/2zL2A8m

  • 6:04 Now Playing

    Mapping Riverine Communities

    The community of Lago do Mainá have lived with the forest and the river, nature for them is the most fundamental thing they have. However a military training base and increasing incursions by soldiers created tension between the community and the army. Through the use of social mapping the people of Lago do Mainá have been able to secure rights to a concession where they can continue to live as they have done centuries.

  • 7:33 Now Playing

    Brazil's Warrior Women

    The humble babassu palm provides a livelihood for communities of women across North Eastern Brazil. Bread, charcoal, oil and soap are produced from the nut and husk; the surplus is sold on. But production has not always been so peaceful. Babassu: Brazil’s Warrior Women tells the story of the hard battle to maintain these communities’ way of life. In the face of intimidation and threats from farmers for years, Babassu women have negotiated their own terms; creating a grassroots movement and establishing the ‘Free Babassu Law’ in seven states. The law gives landless coconut gatherers rights to collect from palm groves. These inspiring women are now able to plan for the long-term, diversifying their business and securing their future. They fight for their families, their forests and the Amazon as a whole.

  • 1.04 Now Playing

    "We are here to defend the environment" - Jurandie Siridiwe Xavante - Xavante people

    Even before Jair Bolsonaro won Brazil’s Presidential race in November 2018, many environmentalists were on high alert. Brazil’s precious rainforests live under constant threats of deforestation and economic exploitation.

Playlist - Films from Brazil

Short films from Brazil, from our partners and from the If Not Us Then Who? project, exploring themes around land rights, womens’ rights, traditional knowledge and food as well as activism and protecting the forest.

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